How to Virtually Look Your Best

How to Virtually Look Your Best

With the industry in flux as COVID-19 halts in-person events, more Associations and planners are shifting their scheduled meetings to a fully virtual experience. In an already stressful environment, virtual meetings can create a whole new set of logistical challenges if the team is new to the process. We here at ImageAV and e-Attend specialize in the planning, executing and distributing of virtual meetings and have seen an increase in inquiries as conferences find a contingency plan.

Since we handle the scheduling and recording of each event presenter, we spend a lot of time working with each individual to ensure they have the correct offsite set-up for the best recording results. We’d like to share some of our best practices for anyone looking to record a virtual session.

What to wear?

Overly bright or patterned shirts and tops create a distraction for the viewer and any colors that are close to the presenter’s skin tone or background can wash them out. Lighter or pastel colors translate the best on camera, especially cooler shades of blue.  The same rules apply for jewelry that may reflect in the light, or make noise when the presenter moves (like bangles or long earrings).

We say keep it simple, professional and comfortable.

Correctly frame your camera.

For a single person, frame the video from the top of the chest to the top of the head, with very little space above the head. The presenter should be centered when facing the camera. The camera also needs to be eye-level and on the monitor you plan to use.

If there is a group shot, try to fill the frame with people leaving as little wasted space as possible.

Pay attention to your background.

If possible, avoid having a blank wall behind the speaker. Try to add some texture or something interesting as a backdrop – as long as it’s not distracting or more brightly lit than the speaker. Have some fun here! Create a background that gives the audience a look into the presenter’s personality. Above all though, the background art should be work-appropriate and the space be clean.

Don’t forget the lights

It’s important to face the primary light source. If there is light coming through a window, have the speaker face that window.

Ready to present!

We always encourage the presenter to join fifteen minutes before the scheduled start time. There is nothing worse than experiencing technical difficulties with little to no time to fix, then feeling rushed through the presentation. This gives the speaker time to get to know the software and understand how to move through the PowerPoint, and ask our team any questions before taping begins.

The speaker should project her voice into the microphone and remember to keep the speaker volume low to prevent unnecessary feedback. Consider using earbuds to isolate the return sound from the microphone.

When presenting, look into the camera instead of yourself on the screen. This can be tricky for some people, so we recommend an old trick placing craft googly eyes near the computer camera to know where to focus.

Supervising each speaker set-up is one of the many tasks our project managers oversee. We’re here to create a seamless virtual experience for you by handling big and small details throughout our inclusive process, and for your members, by offering high quality recorded content on an intuitive online platform. For a customized quote, please reach out to our team at [email protected].

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